Results tagged “New York State Department of Environmental Conservation”

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) proposes to amend the regulations that implement the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQR, Title 6 New York Code of Rules and Regulations (6 NYCRR), Part 617). The principal purpose of the amendments is to streamline the SEQR process without sacrificing meaningful environmental review.


For Prof. Salkin's analysis and copies of the draft regulations, click here...




Information Posted about DEC's New Approach for Clean Water Plans


DEC is implementing a new approach to addressing the water quality issues in identified lakes, rivers and streams on the Section 303(d) List of Impaired Waters. This new approach is described in a document just posted to DEC's website entitled, the Vision Approach to Implement Clean Water Act 303(d) Program and Clean Water Planning (PDF, 832 KB). This document describes New York's adaptive strategy to prioritize waterbodies for the development of clean water plans based on the state's identified priority concerns: nutrients, pathogens and public use. For more information about clean water plans, visit DEC's Clean Water Plans webpage.

Clearwaters Column on Wastewater Infrastructure Funding

A column about wastewater infrastructure funding written by DEC Deputy Commissioner for Water Resources James Tierney is now available on the Columns by DEC Staff Appearing in Clearwaters webpage. The column discusses several state and federal wastewater infrastructure funding opportunities. This column was originally published in this spring's issue of Clearwaters magazine.


Revised NYS Bulk Storage Regulations - Webinar Update

Update - Public Webinars on Revised New York State Bulk Storage Regulations  - Next Webinar February 1, 2016

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) issued new petroleum and chemical bulk storage regulations that became effective October 11, 2015.

DEC hosted a webinar on November 23, 2015 that provided an overview of the Petroleum Bulk Storage (PBS) regulations.  DEC hosted a second webinar on January 11, 2016 that focused on the requirements for Underground Storage Tanks regulated under 6 NYCRR Subpart 613-2.  A file of the presentation and a link to the recording of the webinar are now available on DEC's Revised Bulk Storage Regulations Webinar Page. 

The third webinar in the series will be held on February 1, 2016 and will focus on the requirements for Underground Storage Tanks regulated under 6 NYCRR Subpart 613-3.  Details and login information are also available on DEC's Bulk Storage Webinar Page

A Future webinar will focus on requirements on tanks regulated under Subpart 613-4.
Underground storage tank installation


Update - Public Webinars on Revised New York State Bulk Storage Regulations

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) issued new petroleum and chemical bulk storage regulations that became effective October 11, 2015.

DEC hosted a webinar on November 23,2015 that provided an overview of the Petroleum Bulk Storage (PBS) regulations.  A file of the presentation and a link to the recording of the webinar are now available on DEC's Revised Bulk Storage Regulations Webinar Page. 

The next webinar will be held on January 11, 2016 and will focus on the requirements for Underground Storage Tanks regulated under 6 NYCRR Subpart 613-2.  Details and login information are also available on DEC's Bulk Storage Webinar Page

Future webinars will focus on requirements on tanks regulated under Subpart 613-3 and Subpart 613-4.
Underground storage tank installation

The SEQR Findings Statement for high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) was issued on June 29, 2015. This concluded DEC's comprehensive, seven-year review and officially prohibits HVHF in New York.

The full 2015 Final SGEIS document is available as two large PDF files: Volume 1 (PDF) (35.8 MB) and Volume 2 (PDF) (8.4 MB). Although they are very large files, they are downloadable and searchable. Please note that new text in the final SGEIS has been underlined to indicate revisions to the 2011 revised draft SGEIS text, in accordance with the requirements of the SEQRA regulations, and vertical lines have been placed in the page margins at those locations.




On January 25, 2012, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation ("NYSDEC") adopted revised model EAFs. The revised EAFs replace the existing ones included in 6 NYCRR 617.20, Appendices A, B, and C, and are a general update to the existing forms. These revisions are the first major updates to the Short and Full EAFs in decades. They incorporate consideration of new areas of environmental concern (i.e. climate change, brownfields, storm water). In addition to substantive changes, the structure of the forms has also been updated to make them easier to use. The new forms become effective on October 7, 2013.

Both the Short and Full revised EAFs can be found on NYSDEC's website: 

http://www.dec.ny.gov/permits/70293.html

To assist in the preparation of the revised EAFs, NYSDEC has developed SEQR Environmental Assessment Forms Guidance Documents that provide instructions, background information, links to maps and illustrations, and additional guidance. These guidance documents are generally referred to as the SEAF and FEAF Workbooks and can be found on NYSDEC's websites: 


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On September 28, the New York Department of Environmental Conservationannounced its release of proposed regulations for "high-volume hydraulic fracturing," which the proposed regulations define as hydraulic fracturing operations that use more than 300,000 gallons of water.  





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From Keith B. Hall : Louisiana Lawyer : Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann Law Firm:

The New York Department of Environmental Conservation announced today its release of a a lengthy Economic Assessment Report that evaluates the economic effects that would result from the use of hydraulic fracturing within New York.  The DEC stated that its analysis "confirms that high-volume hydraulic fracturing activities could provide a substantial economic boost for the state in the areas of employment, wages and tax revenue for state and local governments."

***

The information released by the DEC today included: its announcement; a two-page Fact Sheet that summarizes economic impacts of hydraulic fracturing; a two-page Fact Sheet that summarizes local and community impacts; and the full, approximately 250-pages-long Economic Assessment Report.  

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Full Text of Preliminary Revised Draft Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement on the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Regulatory Program


Well Permit Issuance for Horizontal Drilling And High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing to Develop the Marcellus Shale and Other Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs


New York State Department of Environmental Conservation 


July 1, 2011



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