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Village People's Original Lead Singer Victorious in Termination Lawsuit

By Christine A. Pepe, AVP ASCAP

In Scorpio Music S.A., et al. v. Victor Willis, Judge Moskowitz of the Southern District of California ruled that Victor Willis, song writer and original lead singer of the Village People, could unilaterally exercise his right of termination under the Copyright Act and reclaim his interests in 33 musical compositions, including iconic works such as "Y.M.C.A." and "In the Navy." The decision represents a victory for songwriters and performing artists who typically license or assign their copyrights to music publishers or record labels. To summarize, if an author of a joint work individually executes a grant of copyright to a third party, he or she may unilaterally terminate that grant without majority consent of the other joint authors.

In July 2011, defendant Willis served on the plaintiffs, music publishers to whom Willis had previously transferred his copyright interests in certain compositions, a notice of termination of grants of copyright for 33 musical works. The plaintiffs brought suit against Willis seeking declaratory judgment that: (1) Willis' notice was invalid and (2) should the court find the notice to be valid, Willis' reversion of rights is limited to the royalty percentage that he received under the agreements between the parties.

As Willis' transfer of copyright occurred after January 1, 1978, Section 203 of the Copyright Act applies, which reads in relevant part as follows:

(a) Conditions for Termination.--In the case of any work other than a work made for hire, the exclusive or nonexclusive grant of a transfer or license of copyright or of any right under a copyright, executed by the author on or after January 1, 1978, otherwise, than by will, is subject to termination under the following conditions:

(1) In the case of a grant executed by one author, termination of the grant may be effected by that author . . . . In the case of a grant executed by two or more authors of a joint work, termination of the grant may be effected by a majority of the authors who executed it . . .

See 17 U.S.C. ยง 203 (emphasis added).

With regard to the validity of Willis' termination, the plaintiffs argued that under Section 203 (a)(1), because the subject compositions were joint works, a majority of all authors who transferred their copyright interests in a particular work must join in a termination. In other words, Willis could not unilaterally terminate his grant of copyright. The plaintiffs argued that the statute's language, "In the case of a grant executed by two or more authors of a joint work, termination of the grant may be effected by a majority of the authors who executed it" applies. They urged that the term "grant" as used in this phrase refers collectively to all grants by authors of a joint work, even if they were separate transactions.

Starting with the plain meaning of the statute, the court noted that when referring to a grant executed by two or more authors of a joint work, section 203(a)(1) refers to a "grant" in the singular--not "grants." Based on this observation, the court concluded that if two or more joint authors execute a single grant, only then is a majority necessary to effectuate a termination. If a single author of a joint work executes an individual grant, as Willis did, then that co-author can unilaterally terminate the copyright grant without obtaining consent of the other authors. Such a reading, the court held, harmonizes with the law governing copyright co-ownership--that each co-owner of a joint work holds an undivided interest in the whole and in the absence of an agreement to the contrary, may always transfer or license his or her interest in the joint work to a third party, subject only to a duty of accounting to the other co-owners. As the termination time is calculated from the date of grant execution, the court also found plaintiffs' proposed construction unwieldy. If the term "grant" consists of multiple separately executed grants by joint authors, how would the "date of execution" be calculated? Such a reading, the court determined, would create uncertainty "regarding the date of execution, which could become a moving target."

In the event that Willis' termination notice was valid, the plaintiffs alternatively argued that his reversion of rights should be limited to the royalty percentage that he received under the agreements between the parties. Again relying on traditional principles of copyright co-ownership, the court rejected this argument. Absent an agreement to the contrary, joint authors share equally in the ownership of the joint work, even if their contributions to the work were not equal. In other words, if Willis was one of three joint authors, he would have 1/3 undivided copyright interest in the musical work and upon an effective termination, he would get back exactly that--1/3 undivided copyright interest. The royalty percentage that was negotiated has no bearing on the copyright interest.

Obviously, this decision represents a victory for songwriters and recording artists who wish to terminate their copyright grants. Going forward, it is likely that music publishers and record labels will, as a matter of practice, attempt to have all joint authors execute one single grant so that majority consent is required for there to be an effective termination.

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on May 24, 2012 10:04 AM.

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