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Center for Art Law Case Updates

The following case selection first appeared in this week's Center for Art Law newsletter:

Castillo v. G&M Realty LP, 2015 WL 3776891 (E.D.N.Y. June 3, 2015) -- Nine graffiti artists have filed suit against Jerry Wolkoff, owner of the landmark 5Pointz site in Queens, for destroying their murals when his company, the named plaintiff, whitewashed the building in late 2013. The plaintiffs allege that their works were protected by the Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA) and seek compensation for their "gratuitous, willful, and wanton" removal without prior notice or regard for the plaintiffs' feelings or financial interests.

Washington v. Kaul, Case No. 15-1-02149-6 (Wash. Super. June 2, 2015) -- Christopher Robert Kaul, a warehouse worker for glass artist Dale Chihuly, has been charged in Tacoma, Washington with stealing $3 million worth of art to support a drug habit. Kaul admitted to the FBI that he began stealing art in late 2012 and would sell the famous glassblower's works or trade them for pills. He told buyers that he was able to get an employee discount. A private investigator has so far recovered nearly half of the stolen works.

United States v. Qiu, 2015 WL 2250716 (E.D.Tex. 2015) -- Ning Qiu, a Texas art appraiser, has been sentenced to 25 months in prison for conspiring to smuggle rhinoceros horns and elephant ivory out of the country. Qiu pleaded guilty to smuggling $1 million worth of the contraband into to China. His prison term will be followed by three years and supervision and the payment of a $150,000 fine to a federal conservation law and art fund.

Jaretzki v. Art Finance Partners LLC, 2015 WL 3430655 (S.D.N.Y. May 28, 2015) -- British noblewoman Lady Corinne Green has filed suit in federal court alleging that Timothy Sammons, a Manhattan gallery, sold her Henry Moore watercolor "Figure Studies" for less than the agreed minimum price of $461,000. The complaint alleges that when Art Finance Partners bought the painting for $360,000, they "knew or should have known that Sammons did not have the ability or right to convey good title to the artwork."

The Center for Art Law strives to create a coherent community for all those interested in law and the arts. Positioned as a centralized resource for art and cultural heritage law, it serves as a portal to connect artists and students, academics and legal practitioners, collectors and dealers, government officials and others in the field. In addition to the weekly newsletter (http://cardozo.us2.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=78692bfa901c588ea1fe5e801&id=022731d685), the Center for Art Law subscribers receive updates about art and law-related topics through its popular art law blog (http://itsartlaw.com/blog/)and calendar of events (http://itsartlaw.com/events/). The Center for Art Law welcomes inquiries and announcements from firms, universities and student organizations about recent publications, pending cases, upcoming events, current research and job and externship opportunities. To contact the Center for Art Law, visit our website at: www.itsartlaw.com or write to itsartlaw@gmail.com.

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on July 6, 2015 10:24 PM.

The previous post in this blog was New York Employers Take Note: "Primary Beneficiary Test" to Determine Whether Interns Should Be Paid Under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

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