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Center For Art Law Case Law Updates

The following case selection first appeared in this week's Center for Art Law newsletter:

Zuckerman v. Metropolitan Museum of Art, 16-cv-7665 (S.D.N.Y. Sep 30, 2016) -- The estate of Paul and Alice Leffman, who fled from Europe in 1938, sued the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Met) to recover Picasso's "The Actor." The estate alleges that the owner was forced to sell the painting at a low price in order to flee the country and that the Met, to whom the work was donated in 1952, should have known that the 1938 sale was made under duress.

Berreau v. McDonald's, 16-cv-07394 (C.D. Cal. Oct. 3, 2016) -- The estate of late graffiti writer SACE is suing McDonald's over its alleged use of his tag in its decor in graffiti-themed restaurants across the country. The suit alleges that the use of the tag clashes with SACE's anti-consumerism and anti-corporate image, thereby diminishing the value of his artwork, which has fetched high prices at auctions.

Mayor Gallery v. Agnes Martin Catalogue Raisonne LLC, 655489/2016 (Sup. Ct. N.Y. Cty. Oct. 17, 2016) -- A British gallery filed suit against the Agnes Martin Catalogue Raisonné LLC for its failure to authenticate paintings that it sold to collectors for millions of dollars. The gallery alleges that the defendant failed to exhibit an adequate level of care in reaching its conclusions and was responsible for the gallery having to refund the purchases prices of the paintings.

Craig v. Princeton Enter., 2:16-cv-10027 (E.D. Mich. 2016) -- A Detroit artist filed suit against a property owner and manager under the Visual Artist Rights Act, seeking to enjoin them from damaging or destructing a mural that she painted on a building in 2009. Allegedly, the defendants plan to redevelop the property and have offered Katherine Craig only token compensation for any affect on her artwork.

Edelman Arts v. Geoffrey Diner Gallery, 1:2016cv02157 (S.D.N.Y. 2016) -- Art collector Asher Edelman sued the Diner Gallery following severe damage done to a $600,000 Pier Paolo Calzolari work during its shipping. Both parties had their own insurance policies covering the work, which Edelman had consigned to Diner. However, Edelman contends that the work must be repaired by Calzolari himself because, otherwise, the Visual Artist Rights Act would allow Calzolari to disavow the work, greatly devaluing it.

De Fontbrune v. Wofsy, D.C. No. 3:13-cv-05957-SC (9th Cir. Sept. 26, 20160) -- The Ninth Circuit ruled that a $2.2 million copyright infringement judgment issued by a French court is enforceable in California. In 2001, Yves Sicre de Fontbrune, who owned the rights to nearly 16,000 photos of Picasso works taken between 1932 and 1970, won a judgment in a Parisian appeals court against American art editor Alan Wofsy who reproduced the photos in books which were sold in Paris. The court held that, although the French word used for the judgment translates directly to "penalty," it is not an unenforceable penalty because it is the nature of the judgement, and not the dictionary definition, which prevails.

The Center for Art Law strives to create a coherent community for all those interested in law and the arts. Positioned as a centralized resource for art and cultural heritage law, it serves as a portal to connect artists and students, academics and legal practitioners, collectors and dealers, government officials and others in the field. In addition to the weekly newsletter (http://cardozo.us2.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=78692bfa901c588ea1fe5e801&id=022731d685), the Center for Art Law subscribers receive updates about art and law-related topics through its popular art law blog (http://itsartlaw.com/blog/)and calendar of events (http://itsartlaw.com/events/). The Center for Art Law welcomes inquiries and announcements from firms, universities and student organizations about recent publications, pending cases, upcoming events, current research and job and externship opportunities. To contact the Center for Art Law, visit our website at: www.itsartlaw.com or write to itsartlaw@gmail.com.

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on November 1, 2016 11:34 AM.

The previous post in this blog was Lack of Documentary Evidence Sinks Two Recent Trademark Applications.

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