December 2016 Archives

Welcome to the December 2016 Issue of Electronically In Touch

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We are pleased to submit the final issue of Electronically In Touch for 2016. This issue includes part II of a three part op-ed on policing by a current member of the New York City Police Department, an article on New York's non-exempt wage and salary requirements, and tips on making the best first impression in litigation, as well as reports from the Real Property Law and Environmental Law Sections.

Electronically In Touch is a member driven publication. We welcome submissions from members on any relevant topic, including practice tips, substantive legal articles, case updates, work/life balance, and information regarding upcoming meetings and events. Please submit articles to Sasha R. Grandison, Esq. at srgrandison@gmail.com by the 1st of each month.

The Officers of YLS and the Editor of Electronically In Touch wish to make clear that the thoughts and opinions expressed in the articles that follow are those of the respective authors and do not represent the thoughts and opinions of the New York State Bar Association, Young Lawyers Section, its Officers, or Executive Committee.

Wishing you all a Happy and Prosperous New Year!

A Message from the Chair of the Young Lawyers Section

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The holidays are here, and they bring a season of networking opportunities for young attorneys and law students. But these possibilities can only turn into career builders with the proper preparation and follow-up.

When I first started networking, I didn't gain many successful contacts. I would go to events, meet pleasant people and follow up by connecting on LinkedIn. But my process would end there, and I wound up with a lot of LinkedIn "connections" that I have never truly connected with.

I finally meet some great people who helped me understand that most of the time dedicated to networking will go into preparation and follow-up. Only a small amount of your time will actually be spent at the networking event.

First, prepare for the event by researching the organization and the attendees to the extent possible. This might include a finding a membership profile of that group. Then you can decide what type of person you are hoping to meet at that event and what you hope to achieve by meeting that person. I know alumni events for my college provide a list of registered attendees which can be very helpful.

After the event, follow up, follow up, and follow up again. This does not mean you should overwhelm your new connections with similar emails repeatedly. Instead, extend an invitation for coffee so you can further a discussion you were having at the event. You could also send an article that focuses on some aspect of business your contact would be interested in. Don't forget to thank the contact for any introductions or referrals they made and update them on how those introductions are going. Adding this type of substance to your follow up will get you the reply you are looking for.

Most importantly, be yourself and enjoy these events. NYSBA YLS had a number of holiday parties and even more events at Annual Meeting. I hope to see you at the upcoming events.

Erin K. Flynn
Erin.k.flynn@gmail.com

By: Anonymous Six Year Rookie/Veteran of the New York City Police Department

Part II- Selective Enforcement

"Hey, this isn't Brooklyn, you aren't working in the hood anymore. You do that over there, not here."

Somewhere between 2012 and 2013 I was transferred from Brooklyn to Lower Manhattan, as part of an initiative to intermingle cops who worked in different areas of the city in effort to develop a better-rounded and diversely prepared police force. It was on my first day working in Manhattan when I discovered that the style of policing I was taught, was exclusive to the type of area I was working in.

While riding along with a senior officer who spent 12 years working in this area, I noticed a male apparently in his mid-30's riding a bicycle on the sidewalk. This may not sound like an issue to some, however, New York City is heavily congested and has exclusive street lanes dedicated to bicyclists. Such an act will generally earn the rider a criminal court summons. As indicated by Ashley Cusick of the Brooklyn Ink, this type of enforcement falls into the category of "quality of life" summonses in New York City. These quality of life summonses include, littering, staying in the park after dark, walking a dog without a leash, or even drinking beer on your own stoop. See http://thebrooklynink.com/2013/11/04/52922-are-quality-of-life-policies-still-out-of-control/.

I mentioned to the senior officer that I was going to stop the man and upon further discussion, possibly issue him a summons for the violation he was committing, as I always exercised my discretion in determining whether to issue a summons.

"Hey, this isn't Brooklyn, you aren't working in the hood anymore. You do that over there, not here." This was the response I was given by the senior officer, which left me a bit confused and led me to think back to Brooklyn, where I would stop a person for a low level violation or for any reason that led to an arrest for an active warrant.

Sixteen year old children without a job to seemingly law abiding citizens without extra money to spare were issued summonses for this same violation. When the sixteen year old or poor citizen could not or did not pay the fine, a warrant was issued for their arrest. I mean hey, a sixteen year old child is not always the most responsible person, even if he or she had the money to pay the fine. More likely than not, the individual would be clueless regarding the warrant until he or she made contact with the police many years later.

Imagine the feeling of having to bring in a (now) responsible adult with a family and career and send them to central booking for a bicycle ticket he or she received at age 16. While on the other hand, individuals who are committing the same violations are not stopped because of their location and assumed social status.

The Root

In 1994, New York City Mayor, Rudy Giuliani, took steps toward creating a computer system that would not only document court attendance for individuals who were issued low level summonses, but would also generate arrest warrants for those who did not appear. As a result, the same type of warrant issued for a felony suspect who failed to appear for a court date, was now issued for a low level petty violator, who often was not even aware of the local laws. Frankly, I get it, I really do...but then again, I don't get it... I just don't.

The Downside

If you have been following New York City news lately, you may be familiar with the current Mayor's push to decriminalize quality of life violations.

My aforementioned real life example serves as a looking glass into the culture that exists between law enforcement and the communities in which we serve. The benefit of the doubt is often given to those who live in more affluent areas, while citizens that reside in poorer neighborhoods are more likely to be arrested and charged for both minor and larger infractions, violations, and crimes.

Statistics, when referenced correctly, should offer the general public some understanding of who is committing crimes, where they are being committed, and who is at risk. But this is not always the case and statistics are often misleading as to who commits crimes and where they are primarily committed. Without constant interaction, some rely upon the media and statistics to obtain an idea as to what a neighborhood and the people that reside in it are like.

How many times have you watched or read a news story that a suspect, police shooting victim, or convicted individual had multiple warrants and/or arrests. On the surface, many will conclude that the person is a pretty bad individual and a blight on society. However, one's opinion may change once we delve into the reasons for the warrants and begin to examine whether or not this person's criminal record was the product of selective enforcement and quality of life policing.

Indeed, the most dangerous effect of selective enforcement is the distrust it creates between police officers and the communities we serve, as well as the relationship between those communities and individuals that live in other areas.

The Reality

To bring some perspective to the matter of selective enforcement, and to take it a step further to include selective prosecution, I will close with an example of one arrest I made in my career. My partner and I responded to a radio run (dispatched job based on a 911 call) for a fight in lower Manhattan (where at this point I'd been working for a few years). Here a very affluent man was hosting a rehearsal dinner party for his daughter and her fiancé, a professional in his early 30's who also came from an affluent family.

We arrive on scene to find that the heavily intoxicated groom to be was in a physical altercation with his mother at the rehearsal dinner. I promptly placed him under arrest despite efforts by both families to convince me not to do my job. There was no discretion to be used here, this was a must arrest situation. Here is where money, social status, connections and all the things that come in that package exposes the dark side of selective enforcement and what truly drives the practice - power. By the time I began to process the arrest, there were several phone calls to the precinct from politicians, local religious leaders, and high ranking superiors within the NYPD all inquiring about the situation and trying to determine if anything could be done on behalf of the suspect.

I would assume that without further elaboration, many people reading this would come to the conclusion that this man was not prosecuted for this crime. But what if you learned the groom's mother sustained multiple contusions and a broken arm? Indeed, the groom was arrested. However, he was expedited through the court system. He arrived at central booking at 3:00 a.m., in front of a judge by 10:00 a.m. (unheard of ), and made it to his wedding on time with a sealed arrest record.

If the tables were turned, even if the mother refused to complain, individuals from minority or poorer communities would have been prosecuted to the full extent of the law. But not this groom, not these type of people, and not now, if ever. All while some kid, from a poor or minority neighborhood sat in a cold cell, with a broken toilet, next to an accused murderer for 16 hours waiting to see a judge because he rode his bike on a sidewalk and forgot to pay his summons.

Selective enforcement is not only dangerous, but it contributes to the most detrimental parts of our society to include racial/societal stereotypes, unfair/leading statistics, and seemingly valid reasons for unchecked mass incarceration. I'm of the belief that the steps toward change and repair begin with focusing on community policing and creating a Law Enforcement culture that is not only productive, but also more ethical when it comes to discretionary enforcement.

As such, my third and final entry will cover ethics and community policing.


By: Stefan Savic, Esq.

It goes without saying that the content of your briefs and pleadings is one of the most outcome-determinative factors in litigation. But the importance of presentation and making the best possible first impression is often-overlooked in terms of its importance in advancing the client's case. While it will likely not decide the merits of a given matter, how you present yourself and your work will have an impact on the perception of your credibility and professionalism.

When it comes to personal appearance, there are very few official guidelines pertaining to dress code. The rules have fortunately abandoned the matching robes and wigs requirements and only require that lawyers maintain courtroom dignity and decorum. That is likely so because lawyers, as adults who successfully went through law school and bar admission procedures, should know what is appropriate to wear to court or arbitration. Yet, every now and then, there is a story about a lawyer wearing jeans or sneakers to an appearance.

Lawyers are getting less and less face time before judges, so leaving a good impression with personal appearance matters. The price of the suit and the name on the tag inside the jacket or the shoes will not lose anyone any credibility, but a poorly fitted suit or unmatched colors may. Showing that you spent some time assuring that you look presentable may suggest that you spent at least the same effort on your work. Some of my older colleagues are still proponents of the court uniforms: navy or dark gray suits with a white dress shirt and a red tie. I think that the time of a very strict dress codes is behind us and it is fine for a shirt to have discreet stripes or for a suit to be of a more modern pattern, but the importance of a more conservative look in the courtroom remains important. Before you even say a word, your appearance will speak for you, so use that to your advantage.

Lawyers often spend even less effort, if any, on the aesthetic appearance of their work-product. Of course, the substantive presentation of arguments whether oral or written is perhaps the single most important component of prevailing in a case. As such, the endless number of books and articles on persuasive writing is well-justified. The importance of the more superficial presentation of the arguments -- its packaging if you will -- is, however, often overlooked.

I remember from the days I spent in judges' chambers that it was very difficult not to give more credibility to well-put-together briefs and material before even opening the covers. There is an inherent assumption that the aesthetically more pleasing work is somehow more trustworthy. I am not saying this is right, but it is simply in everyone's nature to form judgments based on the quality of physical presentation.

The outside aesthetics, so to call it, include, among other things, the binding, tabbing, and paper quality. The goal of having the more presentable papers from the outset is two-fold, show that you know what you are doing and make the reader want to read your submission over others. If you are submitting exhibits with your memorandum or an affirmation, make sure to have the properly labeled exhibits tabs. If it is a larger brief, you may consider using the velobinding machine for the courtesy copies. These are easy and inexpensive habits that may boost your and your client's impression with the audience.

Similarly, keeping things "pretty" within the brief keeps the reader focused on the substance. The goal here is more to avoid distraction than to make things look inviting, since you have to keep the necessary level of aesthetics on every page. Simply flipping through a document without reading any of it can give the audience a notion that you did not care to spend an extra moment to make sure everything is in order. Things like orphans and widows, headings that are split onto two pages, or an unaligned table of contents are all distractions that take a few seconds to fix upon the final review of the papers.

While it may not win or lose you a case by itself, being presentable and having presentable work product can buy you some always much-needed credibility. It will help your client's case as well as your own perception and reputation.

Stefan Savic is an attorney at Balestriere Fariello in New York City who represents clients in trials, appeals, mediation, and in consultation on transactions. He focuses on commercial litigation in courts around the nation, including business disputes before federal and state courts in matters involving contract disputes, directors' fiduciary duties, misappropriation of trade secrets, unfair trade practices, and RICO claims. Stefan also has represented clients in nationwide class actions and False Claims Act litigations. You can reach him by email at stefan.n.savic@balestrierefariello.com

Real Property Law Section Liaison Update

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Co-Liaisons: John P. Christopher, Esq., Christopher M. Tarnok, Esq., and Michael J. Barone, Jr., Esq.

The end of the year is upon us and we are gearing up for the annual meetings which are scheduled to take place between January 23rd and 27th in New York City at the Hilton Midtown. Registration is now open. Newly admitted attorneys of 3 years or less (admitted after January 1, 2014) who register by January 13, 2017 receive a 33% discount on the general registration fee! The Young Lawyers Section will be hosting an informative CLE program on Wednesday, January 25th from 8:45-12:15pm on time management, leadership in NYSBA and career skills. The Real Property Law Section will be hosting a CLE program on Thursday, January 26th from 8:00-12:15pm. Save the date and stay tuned for additional details. The Bridging the Gap 2017 Program, geared towards newly admitted attorneys and recent graduates and offering 16 MCLE credits, will also take place on Thursday and Friday, January 26-27th from 9:00-5:00pm.

The 10th District of the NYSBA Young Lawyers Section, the NCBA's Young Lawyer's Section and the NYSBA Real Property Section hosted their annual Holiday Party on Thursday, December 5, 2016 at "Eleanor Rigby's" in Mineola. Members brought unwrapped toys that were donated to Toys-for-Tots. Complimentary appetizers and drink specials were provided. The 8th District of the Real Property Section hosted a complimentary "Meet and Greet on December 2, 2016 at the Robert H. Jackson U.S. Courthouse Lobby, 2 Niagara Square in Buffalo, NY.

New York's Nonexempt Wage and Salary Requirements Still in Play

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By: Ricki E. Roer, Celena R. Mayo, Valerie L. Hooker, and Alexandra Manfredi

While the media has been focused on the stay of the new federal overtime exemption classification rules in Nevada v. U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, No. 16-cv-741, and the Department of Labor's appeal of the stay, New York employers need to beware! New York State's proposed rules are poised to go into effect, possibly on December 31, 2016.

On October 19, 2016, in anticipation of the federal FLSA modifications going into effect on December 1, 2016, the NYDOL published a proposed Wage Order that would increase the minimum salary requirements for executive and administrative employees to be exempt from overtime (unlike the federal rules, the New York Wage Order does not set a minimum salary requirement for professional employees). The public comment stage for the NYDOL proposed Wage Order ended on December 3, 2016. The state legislature can now enact the rules, and these changes could go into effect as early as December 31, 2016.

The proposed New York Wage Order increases the minimum salary requirement necessary for executive and administrative employees to be exempt from overtime. The proposed schedule of exempt salary requirements for administrative and executive employees would be as follows on the following effective dates:

New York City: Large Employer (11 or more)
12/31/16- $825.00 ($42,900/year)
12/31/17- $974.00
12/31/18- $1,125.00
New York City: Small Employer (10 or fewer)
12/31/16- $787.00 ($40,924/year)
12/31/17- $900.00
12/31/18- $1,012.50
12/31/19- $1,125.00
Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester Counties
12/31/16- $750.00 ($39,000/year)
12/31/17- $825.00
12/31/18- $900.00
12/31/19- $975.00
12/31/20- $1,050.00
12/31/21- $1,125.00
Other New York Counties
12/31/16- $727.50 ($37,830)
12/31/17- $780.00
12/31/18- $832.00
12/31/19- $885.00
12/31/20- $937.50

The proposed Wage Order also calls for yearly increases to the uniform maintenance allowance (a sum paid to employees in addition to the applicable minimum wage) also potentially beginning on December 31, 2016. These increases would vary by the employee's total weekly hours worked, employer size, and location within the state.

Reminder: New York's Minimum Wage Increase Has Already Been Enacted and Will Be Effective December 31, 2016.

On April 4, 2016, as part of New York's 2016−2017 budget, Governor Cuomo signed legislation gradually increasing the minimum wage until it reaches $15.00 throughout the state by December 31, 2021.

The schedule of minimum wage increases is as follows:

New York City: Large Employer (11 or more)
12/31/16- $11.00
12/31/17- $13.00
12/31/18- $15.00
New York City: Small Employer (10 or fewer)
12/31/16- $10.50
12/31/17- $12.00
12/31/18- $13.50
12/31/19- $15.00
Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester Counties
12/31/16- $10.00
12/31/17- $11.00
12/31/18- $12.00
12/31/19- $13.00
12/31/20- $14.00
12/31/21- $15.00
Other New York Counties
12/31/16- $9.70
12/31/17- $10.40
12/31/18- $11.10
12/31/19- $11.80
12/31/20- $12.50
12/31/21- TBD

After the increase to $12.50 per hour on December 31, 2020, the minimum wage for workers outside New York City, Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester will continue to increase according to an indexed schedule. The Director of the Division of Budget in conjunction with the New York Department of Labor will set the minimum wage until it reaches $15.00 per hour.

Fast Food Workers
The current minimum wage for fast food workers is $10.50 per hour in New York City and $9.75 per hour in the rest of the state. The schedule of minimum wage increases for fast food workers is as follows effective on the following dates:

New York City:
12/31/16- $12.00
12/31/17- $13.50
12/31/18- $15.00
12/31/19- $15.00
12/31/20- $15.00
7/1/21- $15.00
Outside New York City
12/31/16- 10.75
12/31/17- $11.75
12/31/18- $12.75
12/31/19- $13.75
12/31/20- $14.50
7/1/21- $15.00

Tipped Employees
The current cash wage for hospitality industry tipped employees is $7.50 per hour and the maximum tip credit is $1.50. The cash wage for all other tipped employees, except building service employees who are not entitled to tip credits, is $7.65 (if tips are at least $1.35 per hour) and $6.80 (if tips are at least $2.20 per hour). The cash wage increases for tipped employees is as follows on the following effective dates:

New York City: Large Employer (11 or more)
12/31/16- $7.50, Tip credit: $3.50, Total: $11.00
12/31/17- $8.70, Tip credit: $4.30, Total: $13.00
12/31/18- $10.00, Tip credit: $5.00, Total: $15.00
12/31/19- $10.00, Tip credit: $5.00, Total: $15.00
12/31/20- $10.00, Tip credit: $5.00, Total: $15.00
12/31/21- $10.00, Tip credit: $5.00, Total: $15.00
New York City: Small Employer (10 or fewer)
12/31/16- $7.50, Tip credit: $3.50, Total: $11.00
12/31/17- $8.00, Tip credit: $4.00, Total: $12.00
12/31/18- $9.00, Tip credit: $4.50, Total: $13.50
12/31/19- $10.00, Tip credit: $5.00, Total: $15.00
12/31/20- $10.00, Tip credit: $5.00, Total: $15.00
12/31/21- $10.00, Tip credit: $5.00, Total: $15.00
Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester Counties
12/31/16- $7.50, Tip credit: $2.50, Total: $10.00
12/31/17- $7.50, Tip credit: $3.50, Total: $11.00
12/31/18- $8.00, Tip credit: $4.00, Total: $12.00
12/31/19- $8.00, Tip credit: $4.30, Total: $13.00
12/31/20- $9.35, Tip credit: $4.65, Total: $14.00
12/31/21- $10.00, Tip credit: $5.00, Total: $15.00
Other New York Counties
12/31/16- $7.50, Tip credit: $2.20, Total: $9.70
12/31/17- $7.50, Tip credit: $2.90, Total: $10.40
12/31/18- $7.50, Tip credit: $3.60, Total: $11.10
12/31/19- $7.85, Tip credit: $3.95, Total: $11.80
12/31/20- $8.35, Tip credit: $4.15, Total: $12.50
12/31/21- TBD

After the increase to $8.35 per hour on December 31, 2020, the cash wage for tipped employees outside New York City, Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester will continue to increase according to the Division of Budget's analysis of the effects of the gradual wage increases.

Conclusion
The federal and state wage and hour laws are in dramatic flux. Employers need to closely monitor these rapidly changing developments to stay in compliance with the law.


Ricki E. Roer, Esq. is the chair of the Employment & Labor litigation practice at Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP. Celena R. Mayo, Esq. is a Partner in the Employment & Labor litigation practice at Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP. Valerie L. Hooker, Esq. and Alexandra Manfredi, Esq. are Associates in the Employment & Labor litigation practice at Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP. This article was previously published on December 6, 2016 at http://www.wilsonelser.com/news_and_insights/client_alerts/2758-new_yorks_nonexempt_wage_and_salary_requirements.

Environmental Law Section Liaison Update

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Liaison: Meaghan A. Colligan, Esq.

ELS Fall Meeting Provided CLEs for Young lawyers.

On October 16, 2016, the New York State Bar Association's ("NYSBA") Environmental Law Section ("ELS") held its Fall Meeting at the Ostesaga Hotel and Resort in Cooperstown, New York. The ELS Fall Meeting is always a great way for young lawyers to network and earn Transitional Credits within the ELS topic area. The Fall meeting provided 1.5 Credit Hours in Skills, 5.5 Credit Hours in Professional Practice, and 1 Credit Hour in Ethics. Our main skills credit program was called "Basic Environmental Issue Spotting". ELS is often willing to provide scholarships to young attorneys and law students upon request to attend programs.

NEW ELS Social Media Task Force Was Created and Needs Young Leadership.

The ELS Section recently created a new Social Media Task Force to give young lawyers the opportunity to write, network, and get involved in the section. Please email me at mcolligan@nyenvlaw.com to become involved. I am heading the Task Force for the next several months. I am in need of assistance! Our mission statement is as follows:

It is the mission of the New York State Bar Association Environmental Law Section (ELS) Social Media and Electronic Communications Task Force to establish a writing program that engages law students and attorneys to become involved in the Section by creating content in the form of case law and regulatory updates to be distributed to the ELS through our the ELS Community Blog and on LinkedIn and Twitter. This task force will be in effect from November 1, 2016 through May 31, 2017.


ELS is Amending its ByLaws to be More Inclusive of Young Lawyers

At the Fall ELS Executive Meeting, I made a motion to amend the Bylaws to formalize inclusion of at least one young lawyer (an attorney admitted to practice 10 years or less), the current NYSBA Young Lawyer's Section liaison, and three law students (as non-voting members) on the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee tabled the motion and forwarded our draft the language to the ByLaws Task Force for inclusion. The motion will be re-raised when all proposed revisions to the ByLaws are finalized.

Update on Hazardous Waste and Site Remediation

ELS held an update on Hazardous Waste and Site Remediation Issues on November 15, 2016, at the State Bar Center, Albany, New York 12207. The CERCLA update covered the following topics: 1) Arranger Liability, 2) Divisibility, 3) Statutes of Limitation, 4) 106 vs. 107 Actions, and 5) EPA vs. State Settlements. The NYSDEC update covered the following topics: 1) Title 13 Update, and 2) Brownfields Program. Christopher Goeken, Executive Director, New York State Association of Public Broadcasting presented "The Impact of the 2016 Elections on Federal and State Environmental Agendas" during lunch. Finally, the event discussed PFOA in Municipal and Private Water Supplies, specifically focusing on the issues and implications for New York environmental law and enforcement priorities.

Upcoming Events

Keep your eyes open for ELS' programming at the NYSBA Annual meeting in January, and our annual Oil Spill Symposium in the spring.

ELS Task Force to Work on Environmental Issues in the State Constitution with Respect to the 2017 NYS Ballot Question

A new ELS Task Force, led by Professor Nick Robinson of the Elizabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, will prepare a report about environmental issues in the State Constitution with respect to the 2017 New York State ballot question on whether or not voters wish to convene a constitutional convention in New York. Among the possible task force issues that Executive Committee members raised are: (a) "Forever Wild" mandate, (b) expanding the current "conservation bill of rights" into a self -executing environmental right (c) mandating preparation of "sustainability" reports by state agencies, (d) the importance of supporting agricultural sectors in New York, referenced in Section 4 of Article XIV, and (e) and other "spill over" environmental questions that arise from proposals to change other parts of the Constitution without realizing the environmental implications of those other proffered amendments.

Young Lawyers Section's Annual Meeting

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We hope to see you all at the Young Lawyers Section's Annual Meeting on Wednesday, January 25, 2017. The program offers 4.0 MCLE credit hours and is suitable for newly-admitted attorneys. The program takes place at New York Hilton- Midtown. The half-day program consists of the following:

CPLR -- Strategic Gems and Possible Pitfalls
8:45 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.

Panelist:
Michael J. Hutter, Esq.
Albany Law School
Albany

BREAK
10:25 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.

Ethical Conumdrums, Quandaries and Predicaments
10:40 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Panelists:
Michael Gaynor, Esq.
Deputy Chief Attorney of the Third Judicial Department Attorney Grievance Committee
Albany

Scott W. Bush, Esq.
Corrigan, McCoy & Bush, PLLC
Rensselaer

Building Career Skills Through Leadership
11:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.

Panelists:
Stephen P. Younger, Esq.
Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler, LLP
New York City

Jessica Thaler-Parker, Esq.
Credit Sussie
Tarrytown

John R. McCarron, Esq.
Law Offices of John R. McCarron, Jr.
Carmel

All attendees are welcome to join the Executive Committee for their Annual Meeting and Buffet Luncheon at 12:30 p.m. Curtis A. Johnson, Esq. will be awarded the 2017 Outstanding Young Lawyer Award at the start of the meeting.

You can register for the meeting at http://www.nysba.org/store/events/registration.aspx?event=AM2017

Join The Young Lawyers Section

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Become the voice of newly-admitted and young attorneys in NYSBA. Designed to help make the transition from law school to practice an easier one for newly-admitted attorneys, the Young Lawyers Section connects you with experienced attorneys lending general advice, legal guidance, or expert opinions. Take advantage of educational programs, networking events, and the exclusive Young Lawyers Section Mentor Directory, which is just one of the Section's mentoring initiatives. The Section publishes Electronically In Touch and Perspective. Law students may also join the Section and get a jump start on their careers.

ALREADY A MEMBER OF THIS SECTION? JOIN A COMMITTEE!
Are you interested in volunteering for a Section Committee? Please email Megan O'Toole at motoole@nysba.org and indicate the committees you wish to join.

Disclaimer

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Electronically In Touch
is the electronic news-publication of the NYSBA Young Lawyers Section (YLS). It is a member-driven publication that encourages YLS members to write articles. We welcome submissions from members on any relevant topic, including practice tips, substantive legal articles, case updates, work/life advice, and information regarding upcoming meetings and events. Please submit articles to Sasha Grandison at srgrandison@gmail.com by the 1st of each month.

The Officers of YLS and the Editor of Electronically In Touch wish to make clear that the thoughts and opinions expressed in the articles that follow are those of the respective authors and do not represent the thoughts and opinions of the New York State Bar Association, Young Lawyers Section, or its Officers or Executive Committee.

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