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Nobody thinks the justices should have people banging on their door at all hours of the night, but people congregating on the sidewalk during routine hours to be peaceably seen is kind of a big part of that First Amendment thing that another justice can't remember. The idea that an official within the Supreme Court system would reach out to other government officials to ask them to breach federalism principles to enforce a facially unconstitutional action in violation of multiple Court precedents simply because the Supreme Court thinks it should legitimately exist above the law is disturbing.
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A report issued by the Office of the New York State Comptroller in January 2022, Locally Owned Roads by the Numbers, discussed spending on all roads owned and maintained by local governments, as well as State and federal road aid, and the need for a comprehensive assessment of road conditions, maintenance needs and associated costs. 

The New York State Department of Transportation (DOT) has recently begun to collect data on the conditions of a subset of this group, those local roads eligible for federal funding. The data was collected in 2019 and 2020, and represents just over 25,500 lane-miles, or about 13 percent of the 192,500 locally owned lane-miles in New York State - a percentage that varies quite a bit from place to place, with many rural towns (and one entire county) having no such roads at all. 

This new data allows for an interactive visualization that shows the conditions of these federally fundable local roads for every relevant county, city, town, village and borough (see below). Unfortunately, because the dataset is limited only to federally fundable local roads, it prevents citizens from drawing conclusions about the effectiveness of local spending per lane mile or where State aid might be most appropriately shared.


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The Supreme Court's decision today to take up Moore v. Harper set off alarms across the election law world. The case offers a dramatic reimagining of the balance of powers at the state and federal level. And, importantly, the legal theory at the heart of the case shares considerable DNA with the animating theory that Trump and his cronies drew on as they sought to get the courts to overturn the 2020 election. 


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West Virginia v. EPA confirms that the GOP-controlled Supreme Court will veto any federal regulation it wants.

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West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency strikes down a federal environmental regulation of power plants that never took effect, that the Biden administration has no intention of reinstating, and that would have accomplished absolutely nothing even if it had be enforced.

Nevertheless, the Court voted along ideological lines to strike down this regulation that the EPA drafted under authority granted by the Clean Air Act, claiming that it amounts to an "extraordinary" overreach by the EPA. And their decision has enormous implications both for the environment and for the federal government more broadly.

At the very least, the West Virginia decision strips the EPA of its authority to shift energy production away from dirty coal-fired plants and toward cleaner methods of energy production -- although market forces have thus far accomplished much of this shift on their own, because coal-fired plants are often more expensive to operate than cleaner plants. The decision could also lead to additions limits on the EPA's ability to regulate that industry going forward.

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A teen charged with setting a fire that killed five members of a Senegalese immigrant family in Denver, Colorado, has become the first person to challenge police use of Google search histories to find someone who might have committed a crime, according to his lawyers.  

The pushback against this surveillance tool, known as a reverse keyword search, is being closely watched by privacy and abortion rights advocates, who are concerned that it could soon be used to investigate women who search for information about obtaining an abortion in states where the procedure is now illegal.

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By Ariane de VogueTierney Sneed and Devan Cole, CNN

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The Supreme Court said Monday that a Washington state school district violated the First Amendment rights of a high school football coach when he lost his job after praying at the 50-yard line after games. 

The opinion was 6-3 along conservative-liberal ideological lines.

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Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization - SCOTUSblog

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Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization

Docket No.Op. BelowArgumentOpinionVoteAuthorTerm
19-13925th Cir. Dec 1, 2021Jun 24, 20226-3AlitoOT 2021

Holding: The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey are overruled; the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives.

JudgmentReversed and remanded, 6-3, in an opinion by Justice Alito on June 24, 2022. Justices Thomas and Kavanaugh filed concurring opinions. Chief Justice Roberts filed an opinion concurring in the judgment. Justices Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan filed a dissenting opinion.

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A Practical Guide for Healthcare Providers, Lawyers, Medical Examiners, Child Welfare Workers, and Policymakers

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Since 1973, National Advocates for Pregnant Women ("NAPW") has documented more than 1,700 instances across the country
in which women have been arrested, prosecuted, convicted, detained, or forced to undergo medical interventions because of their pregnancy status or outcomes.
The rate at which state actors are criminalizing pregnant women is accelerating rapidly. NAPW has documented roughly three times as many deprivations of liberty from 2006-2020 than it has from 1973-2005.3

The women subjected to pregnancy- based prosecutions and forced medical interventions are overwhelmingly low income, disproportionately Black and Brown, and the majority are drug-using.4

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New York, Northeast leaders react to Supreme Court gun ruling | WAMC

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WAMC Northeast Public Radio | By Karen Dewitt

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Democratic Governor Kathy Hochul, speaking moments after the ruling, called it deeply disturbing, and says it puts the safety of "millions of New Yorkers" at risk.

"This decision isn't just reckless, it's reprehensible," Hochul said. "It's not what New Yorkers want. And we should have the right of determination of what we want to do in terms of our gun laws in our state. If the federal government will not have sweeping laws to protect us, then our states and our governors have a moral responsibility to do what we can and have laws that protect our citizens."

A recent poll found that three-quarters of New Yorkers wanted the Supreme Court to uphold the law, including the majority of gun owners.


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BY JOHN KRUZEL 

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The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a New York state law that made it difficult to obtain a permit to carry a handgun outside the home, marking the justices' first major opinion on Second Amendment rights in more than a decade.

The 6-3 decision to invalidate New York's law will almost certainly render unconstitutional similar restrictions in more than a half dozen other states that give licensing officials wide discretion over concealed carry permitting.

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Well, the Establishment Clause had a good run.

This morning, the Supreme Court stretched the Free Exercise Clause to swallow the Establishment Clause altogether in Carson v. Makin. Before today, the Court already hamstrung the Establishment Clause by ruling that government programs that funnel funds to religious entities don't necessarily violate the First Amendment, if citizens simply had the choice of sending those funds to religious institutions. Now, for the first time, the Court ruled that government programs must send money to organized religion if a citizen wants to.

You know, that deeply held religious tenet to... have your neighbors pay for your kid to go to religious school.

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The Ghost of Internet Explorer Will Haunt the Web for Years | WIRED

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Microsoft's legacy browser may be dead--but its remnants are not going anywhere, and neither are its lingering risks.

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AFTER YEARS OF decline and a final wind-down over the past 13 months, on Wednesday Microsoft confirmed the retirement of Internet Explorer, the company's long-lived and increasingly notorious web browser. Launched in 1995, IE came preinstalled on Windows computers for almost two decades, and like Windows XP, Internet Explorer became a mainstay--to the point that when it was time for users to upgrade and move on, they often didn't. And while last week's milestone will push even more users off the historic browser, security researchers emphasize that IE and its many security vulnerabilities are far from gone.


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Inflation is everywhere, so it's not surprising, even though it's discouraging, to see the monthly cost to finance a new car reaching record highs, or to hear that experts predict this situation will continue for months to come. Figuring out exactly how much people are now paying differs depending on who's doing the counting, with Edmunds.com finding the average payment for a new car in May reached $656, while Moody's Analytics calculatedthe amount to be $712.

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By Janon Fisher

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Republican gubernatorial wannabe Andrew Giuliani claims he's being picked on by New York's local news station NY1, which barred him from its studios for the next candidates' debate because he is unvaccinated.

The son of former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani says that he should be allowed to debate his political rivals, Lee Zeldin, Harry Wilson and Rob Astorino, at either a neutral location or in the Chelsea studio of the cable news channel.


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"Mr. Giuliani accepted the invitation to the debate knowing the rules and parameters, which include the need to be vaccinated in order to appear live. He will be online, given the same visual space as others, and we are even sending a podium with our camera crew to ensure a similar look and feel for our viewers," Huff said.

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Lawyers are usually able to provide the best legal services possible when they are objective and are governed by reason and not by emotion. Then family comes along ...

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Maryland Apple store employees vote to unionize--WCVB.com 5 Boston

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Tommie Clark

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Out of 110 workers who were eligible to vote, 65 voted yes and 33 voted no. The group named its union the Coalition of Organized Retail Employees, and it received assistance and support from the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers. 

In May, the group sent a letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook, informing him of the support from a "solid majority of (our) coworkers," adding that their team wants more rights to "information and collective bargaining."

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AP By MICHAEL HILL

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"Because the writ of habeas corpus is intended to protect the liberty right of human beings to be free of unlawful confinement, it has no applicability to Happy, a nonhuman animal who is not a 'person' subjected to illegal detention," the decision said. "Thus, while no one disputes that elephants are intelligent beings deserving of proper care and compassion, the courts below properly granted the motion to dismiss the petition for a writ of habeas corpus, and we therefore affirm."

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The six new measures are intended to create additional legal protection for abortion providers and patients, including for some services given to people in a state where abortion may not be legal. It also directs the state Department of Health to study and report back on unmet health and resource needs for pregnant people in New York. 


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By Andy Rose, CNN

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Idaho police officers arrested 31 people Saturday who are believed to be affiliated with the White nationalist group Patriot Front, after they were seen gathering near a Pride parade in the city of Coeur d'Alene, authorities said.

"It is clear to us based on the gear that the individuals had with them, the stuff they had in their possession, the U-Haul with them along with paperwork that was seized from them, that they came to riot downtown," Coeur d'Alene Police Chief Lee White said during a news conference.
The FBI is assisting local police in its investigation, according to FBI Public Affairs Specialist Sandra Yi Barker. Barker said Coeur d'Alene police are the lead law enforcement agency investigating the situation.
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Why It's Impossible to Rent a Car Right Now | WIRED

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What happened? The pandemic, the chip shortage, and the war in Ukraine, for starters. But this isn't just a short-term shock; the car rental market could be changed forever. That's likely to mean permanently higher prices, an influx of electric cars, and the appearance of Chinese brands--and perhaps even the rise of peer-to-peer car sharing as a mainstream alternative, if enough people are willing to share their cars with strangers.

Things started to break down in early 2020, when lockdowns around the world resulted in the car rental market falling off a cliff. Almost two-thirds of Avis-Budget's rental business at airports vanished, with revenues company-wide sliding 41 percentyear-on-year in 2020. At Europcar, 2020 revenue was down 42 percent, and Hertz's revenue fell 46 percent before it filed for bankruptcy--though it has since restructured and recovered.

In response to the mayhem, rental companies sold off their cars. In the UK, fleets were slashed by 30 percent, according to the British Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association (BVRLA), a car rental membership organization. In 2019, Hertz had 700,000 vehicles globally. In the first quarter of 2022, that collapsed to 481,000, according to a company spokesperson. Europcar's fleet size numbered 293,000 vehicles in the first quarter of 2020 but plunged to 187,200 in 2021.

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