May 2019 Archives

Tesla Sentry Mode leads to another arrest, says police - Electrek

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Building on its previously released dashcam feature, Tesla enabled the use of more cameras around the vehicle and activated a "stand-by" parking mode.

The feature became Sentry Mode, which also includes an alarm and notification system to deter thieves even more -- efficiently creating a system to watch over Tesla vehicles when their owners are not around.

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Last month, a woman was reportedly arrested for keying a Tesla after the incident was captured with Sentry mode.

Tesla Sentry mode caught another act of vandalism on a Tesla and the video become extremely popular -- forcing the two vandals to turn themselves in.

We also recently reported on Tesla Sentry Mode capturing crazier and crazier things.

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BY NICOLE BLACK


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For many years, word processing tools were premises-based, and there were very few options. Most firms used either WordPerfect or Microsoft Word. Over time, Word began to dominate, in large part because it was the preferred tool in other industries.

Then, with the emergence of cloud computing tools a little over a decade ago, things began to change. Affordable--and sometimes even free--word processing tools are now available that are accessible online, providing much-needed mobility and flexibility. Lawyers can log on from any internet-enabled device and access their word processing software in the cloud. And using that software, they can create documents that can be stored online in one convenient location.

Even better--there are collaboration tools built right into the software, allowing lawyers to work together in real time. These online collaboration features make it easier than ever to streamline the document creation process, saving both time and money.

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Read more...use links to download ...





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Cashless stores and events are just starting to crop up in the retail landscape with much hoopla -- consider the splashy launches of Amazon Go stores --  but they're already running into hurdles from legislators in cities and states around the countryThese governments are concerned that what some see as technological innovation could actually widen societal gaps between those who have access to financial services and those who don't.

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The Web site for Fortune 500 real estate title insurance giant First American Financial Corp. [NYSE:FAF] leaked hundreds of millions of documents related to mortgage deals going back to 2003, until notified this week by KrebsOnSecurity. The digitized records -- including bank account numbers and statements, mortgage and tax records, Social Security numbers, wire transaction receipts, and drivers license images -- were available without authentication to anyone with a Web browser.

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Many of the exposed files are records of wire transactions with bank account numbers and other information from home or property buyers and sellers. 

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Kentucky Noah's Ark attraction sues over flood damage--AP

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WILLIAMSTOWN, Ky. (AP) -- In the Bible, the ark survived an epic flood. Yet the owners of Kentucky's Noah's ark attraction are demanding their insurance company rescue them from flooding that caused nearly $1 million in property damages.

The Ark Encounter says in a federal lawsuit that heavy rains in 2017 and 2018 caused a landslide on its access road. The Courier Journal reports the attraction's insurance carriers refused to cover damages.

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5G Networks Could Throw Weather Forecasting Into Chaos | WIRED

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https://www.wired.com/author/eric-niiler/


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IF YOU HAD a choice between a better, faster cell phone signal and an accurate weather forecast, which would you pick? That's the question facing federal officials as they decide whether to auction off more of the wireless spectrum or heed meteorologists who say that such a move could throw US weather forecasting into chaos.

On Capitol Hill Thursday, NOAA's acting chief, Neil Jacobs, said that interference from 5G wireless phones could reduce the accuracy of forecasts by 30 percent. That's equivalent, he said, to the quality of weather predictions four decades ago. "If you look back in time to see when our forecast scale was roughly 30 percent less than today, it was 1980," Jacobs told the House Subcommittee on the Environment.

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Court rules NY farm workers have right to organize - Times Union

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By Mallory Moench and Diego Mendoza-Moyers

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ALBANY -- Farm workers in New York have the right to organize and collectively bargain, according to a state appeals court's Thursday ruling that said an exclusion for farm workers in state labor law is unconstitutional.

The opinion from the Appellate Division of state Supreme Court sided with the legal argument of labor advocates who say farm workers in New York have those rights.

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Read full text of opinion...https://iapps.courts.state.ny.us/search/wicket/page?3-IResourceListener-pnlResultContainer-pnlResult-2-lnkDocument




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A federal judge has refused to block a subpoena from the House Committee on Oversight and Reform for eight years of financial records from the accounting firm for President Donald Trump.

Trump filed a lawsuit against Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., chairman of the House committee, last month.

U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta of Washington, D.C., said Congress had sufficient justification to seek the records from Mazars USA, report the New York TimesPolitico, the Wall Street Journal, the Hill, the Washington Post and the National Law Journal. The decision, filed Monday, is here.


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BY JB NICHOLAS

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New York City's plan to close Rikers Island has hit a snag: New York State's parole system, which sends more people back to prison for petty parole violations than nearly every other state in the country.

The plan to close the infamous jail hinges on reducing its population to under 5,000 people, a number that could fit into four new jails to be built near courthouses in Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Queens. Since Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the move two years ago, the city has made steady progress, slashing Rikers' average daily population from 9,400 to around 7,000.

But the number of people jailed on Rikers for violating the terms of their New York State parole is going up, according to the Mayor's Office.

Many of these are technical violators, not jailed for new crimes but for allegedly violating parole supervision rules, such as staying out past curfew, missing an appointment, absconding, smoking marijuana and even informal rules that parole officers sometimes just make up.

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Read much more...in depth article....



Submitted by Scott H.

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I am going to be retiring soon (shhhh... my boss doesn't know yet) [and] over the last 27 years I've built up quite an address book! And a few emails which currently reside within the Microsoft Outlook platform. I would like to transfer this to a personal system (address book, calendar, and email) and like many people I do have a Gmail account but not sure whether that is best and if so how to go about doing that. Thanks!

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Minds Over Matters: Special Report | Law.com

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Minds Over Matters: An Examination of Mental Health in the Legal Profession

Law.com has embarked on a yearlong investigation into mental health across every sector of the legal profession. Over the course of 12 months, we will aim to shine a light on mental health, addiction, stress and well-being; destigmatize the issue; and identify methods to effectuate change.

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By Brian M. Rosenthal

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Over the past year, a spate of suicides by taxi drivers in New York City has highlighted in brutal terms the overwhelming debt and financial plight of medallion owners. All along, officials have blamed the crisis on competition from ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft.

But a New York Times investigation found much of the devastation can be traced to a handful of powerful industry leaders who steadily and artificially drove up the price of taxi medallions, creating a bubble that eventually burst. Over more than a decade, they channeled thousands of drivers into reckless loans and extracted hundreds of millions of dollars before the market collapsed.

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Read much more...very long investigation report...

BY DEBRA CASSENS WEISS

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U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced a new program this week to allow local law enforcement officers to detain some immigrants in the country illegally in sanctuary jurisdictions that bar immigration cooperation.

The program trains local police to become warrant service officers for ICE who can serve warrants on behalf of the agency inside local jails and correctional facilities where they work, according to a press release. ICE will then have 48 hours to take the immigrant into custody.

The program allows local police to detain criminal suspects for ICE for two days past the time at which they would have been released from custody, the Washington Post explains. The Hill also has coverage.

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May 8, 2019, New York - Today, attorneys asked a New York State Supreme Court judge to allow a new student petitioner, sophomore Veer Shetty, to join a lawsuit against Fordham University over the school's refusal to allow a Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) club on campus. Fordham opposed Veer joining the lawsuit and has barred students from forming an SJP since the club was approved by the student government in 2016. The original four petitioners who brought the lawsuit in April 2017 have graduated or will graduate in ten days. Judge Nancy Bannon indicated that parties should expect a decision next week.

"I'm still at Fordham, I still want to form an SJP, and I will continue this lawsuit until I am able to organize freely for Palestinian human rights at my school," said Veer Shetty, Fordham class of 2021, who was seeking to be added to the case today.

The lawsuit argues that Fordham's veto of the student government's approval of SJP was arbitrary and capricious, violating the school's own policies guaranteeing free expression. In November 2017--after two of the original four petitioners had graduated--attorneys asked the court for a prompt order directing Fordham to recognize the SJP club. The court has not yet ruled on that request.

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By ANNA FLAGG

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A lot of research has shown that there's no causal connection between immigration and crime in the United States. But after one such study was reported on jointly by The Marshall Project and The Upshot last year, readers had one major complaint: Many argued it was unauthorized immigrants who increase crime, not immigrants over all.

This story was published in collaboration with The New York Times's Upshot.

An analysis derived from new data is now able to help address this question, suggesting that growth in illegal immigration does not lead to higher local crime rates.

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Court rules immigrants can be deported for marijuana crime-AP

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 A federal appeals court has ruled that California's legalization of marijuana doesn't protect immigrants from deportation if they were convicted of pot crimes before voters approved the new law in 2016.

The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco denied on Friday the appeal of a woman who was convicted in 2014 of possession of marijuana for sale.

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DOJ Alumni Statement

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We are former federal prosecutors. We served under both Republican and Democratic administrations at different levels of the federal system: as line attorneys, supervisors, special prosecutors, United States Attorneys, and senior officials at the Department of Justice. The offices in which we served were small, medium, and large; urban, suburban, and rural; and located in all parts of our country.

Each of us believes that the conduct of President Trump described in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report would, in the case of any other person not covered by the Office of Legal Counsel policy against indicting a sitting President, result in multiple felony charges for obstruction of justice.

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Read more...review list


BY DEBRA CASSENS WEISS

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A Texas law firm claims in a $100,000 lawsuit that a broken printer and a failure to promptly send a repair technician "grossly interfered" with its ability to conduct business.

The Cweren Law Firm in Houston sued in Texas state court last May, but the case was removed to federal court Monday, the Texas Lawyer reports.

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| NEW YORK DAILY NEWS |


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Judge Colleen McMahon made the unusual referral to prosecutors in an 82-page decision allowing a civil suit brought by four inmates -- Davon Washington, Steven Espinal, Pariis Tillery and one identified only as John Doe -- to proceed. The men say they were transferred from Rikers Island to the Albany County Jail for infractions ranging from the petty to the near-deadly.

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How A Fee Win For Lawyers May Help Disabled Workers - Law360

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By Emily Brill 


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U.S. Supreme Court ruling earlier this year created a uniform method for allocating fees across judicial jurisdictions, ensuring attorneys will have access to higher fees regardless of where they practice. Practitioners are mixed on the impact of the ruling but hope it will attract more attorneys to the field of Social Security disability law so more people like Gammon can get help.

They also hope it will secure them enough money to sustain their practices' financial health, which can be precarious due to the nature of accepting jobs without a guaranteed fee.

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Your partner has a heart attack and the first thing you do is inform the attorney discipline committee because you're sure he can't be as strong an advocate with a weakened heart. Absurd. Right?

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