June 2020 Archives

By: Theresa E. Rusnak and Jessica C. Moller

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On June 24, 2020, Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued Executive Order 205 (EO 205), which sets forth restricted travel areas within the U.S. for New Yorkers and those traveling to New York. If an individual arrives in New York after having spent more than 24 hours in a restricted area, the individual could be subject to a 14-day quarantine. This quarantine must be carried out in accordance with New York Department of Health (DOH) regulations for self-quarantining, and violators are subject to penalties of up to $10,000. The DOH reports that it will update the list of restricted states weekly. For more information on EO 205 and the DOH guidance, please see our earlier client alert.

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BY DAVID A. LOWE

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The judge appeared for the practice run with a nifty Zoom virtual background that replicated his courtroom, along with the court reporter and clerk, in their respective remote locations. Opposing counsel dialed in from their conference room in Irvine, California, and my trial team assembled with appropriate distancing at our San Francisco office.

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The US government must release migrant children held in government family detentioncenters by mid-July due to the coronavirus pandemic, a federal judge ruled Friday.

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Read the ruling:


Michael Flynn case: Appeals court orders dismissal - CNNPolitics

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By Katelyn Polantz and Marshall Cohen, CNN

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A federal appeals court on Wednesday ordered Judge Emmet Sullivan to dismiss the case against former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn, a surprise conclusion in a long-running political fight.

Despite Flynn twice pleading guilty for lying to the FBI about his conversations with then-Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the presidential transition, the Justice Department moved last month to dismiss the case against him. Sullivan did not immediately act, instead asking for a review of the decision.


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READ: Judge's order denying DOJ request to block Bolton book | TheHill

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Bolton decision by M Mali on Scribd

BY THE HILL STAFF

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A federal judge on Saturday denied the Trump administration's request to block publication of former national security adviser John Bolton's book.


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Amid the coronavirus, calls have grown to ban the diverse US markets that stock and slaughter live animals. But is that wise? 

by Kimon de Greef


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Bills currently before the New York assembly and senate have requested an immediate moratorium on all live animal markets in the city. If passed, they would see the markets closed until a proposed new taskforce investigates concerns about public health and animal welfare in the sector.


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What Will Happen to Your Digital Life When You Die? --Ride The Lightning

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Sharon D. Nelson, Esq.

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From Instagram to LinkedIn (and soon, Twitter), there are ways your heirs can request access to your accounts once you've died, but why stress them out with those complicated procedures? Several online services allow you to designate legacy contacts or grant access after a period of inactivity. The post teaches you how to manage your digital accounts.

You can create a password manager emergency kit with the keys to all your digital accounts and pass them on to a loved one.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned the Trump administration's decision to phase out a program that deferred deportation for some immigrants.

The decision to rescind the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals was arbitrary and capricious, the Supreme Court said in a majority opinion Thursday by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.

The program, established during the Obama administration, defers deportation and grants work permits for immigrants brought to the country illegally as children. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security decided to phase out the program in 2017.


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By Marcia Coyle 

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The U.S. Supreme Court in a divided decision (full text) Monday said federal workplace laws prohibit employers from firing gay, lesbian and transgender workers.

The justices split 6-3, with Justice Neil Gorsuch writing the majority opinion. He was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts Jr., and the court's liberal wing. Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Samuel Alito Jr. wrote separate dissents. Justice Clarence Thomas joined Alito's dissent.

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"I got most of my guidance, my dealing with the court, from the court officers. We worked with them very well,"  said David Rodriguez, a Deportation Officer who works out of the Varick Street ICE office. "They told us we had to sign in. We sign in. We had to go back to, you know, give a warrant to the judge or to the court officer; we did that. They told us not to make arrests in the courtroom; we did that. We made court arrests outside in the hallway," he said. Read more at Documented.

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iPhone + Apple Watch - Apple

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iPhone JD:

Keep scrolling...

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By Pete Williams

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WASHINGTON -- The retired judge appointed to act as a friend of the court in the Michael Flynn case strongly urged the court Wednesday not to let the Justice Department abandon the prosecution.

In a scorching 83-page submission, John Gleeson said the government's move to drop the case was "riddled with inexplicable and elementary errors of law and fact," which were contradicted by the positions it has taken in other false statement cases and by its own previous court filings about Flynn's conduct as well as his decisions to plead guilty twice.


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By 

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The attacks -- widely viewed as the work of troll farms, where staff for hire spend full shifts defending their clients and disparaging rivals -- marked a grim new development in the Philippines's dystopian Internet landscape.

They were also the latest controversy involving Facebook, which has faced criticism that its platform amplifies disinformation and hate speech, resulting in a corrosive effect on democracy. In the Philippines, the populist leader Rodrigo Duterte has admitted deploying online trolls during his successful presidential campaign in 2016.

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Why You Should Wear a Mask to Your Next Job Interview--LifeHacker

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Nicole Dieker

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Now that more and more states are reopening, job seekers might find themselves in the position of having to decide how to approach an in-person job interview. Should you wear a mask? Should you avoid shaking hands? Should you attempt to stay at least six feet away from your interviewers?

According to Ask a Manager's Alison Green, the answer is yes--to all of the above. As Green recently explained in The Cut:

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by Bernice Yeung

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Thousands of workers in the U.S. with J-1 visas have been laid off as the coronavirus shut down the economy. They can't afford to fly to their home countries -- and can't afford to stay.

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BY ELLEN ROSEN

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Long before social distancing entered the global lexicon, Zoom, the videoconferencing platform, touted its capabilities for lawyers.

In a 2015 blog post, the company suggested its platform could be used for remote depositions, a range of meetings and mediation, among other uses.

That post now also emphasizes its encryption capabilities. That's because without encryption, users could be exposed to hacking and what's become known as Zoom bombing.

That the company felt it necessary to do so represented an acknowledge of the new COVID-19 reality. Zoom is booming, with a reported jump from 10 million daily users at the end of 2019 to 200 million in March. Its stock price has more than doubled since the start of 2020, going from nearly $70 at the beginning of January to just over $200 as of June 1.

But lawyers must be extra careful when using Zoom or any other videoconferencing tool.


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By 


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Safety is an important goal, but you're a lawyer, not a public health official. You may be unsure how to proceed. That's where the newly released New York State Bar Association's law firm re-opening guide comes in. The "New York State Working Group Guidance on Re-Opening Law Firms" was released last week and provides a useful roadmap for law firms in the process of transitioning back to the office. Although released by the New York State Bar Association, the guidance provided is not specific to New York lawyers and can be used by all lawyers, no matter where their law firms happen to be located. 

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