September 2021 Archives

Is Going to the Office a Broken Way of Working? | The New Yorker

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Earlier this month, a technology entrepreneur named Chris Herd posted a thread on Twitter. "I spoke to 10 x Billion $ companies who canceled return to the office due to the delta variant," he began. "A few predictions on what else is going to happen." His first salvo was titled "Office Death," and claimed that "by the time people can return to the office a lot of companies will no longer have space to return to." His next prediction was about "City Flight." He stated that workers would continue to flee cities and would quit if their employers forced them back into urban offices. The thread continued with sixteen more tweets.

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This FREE webinar with Peggy Hoyt of Hoyt & Bryan, LLC provides a look at how to plan your estate for the people, companion animals, and causes that you love.

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Mortgage News Daily--Thomson Reuters

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Mortgage News Daily-Thomson-Reuters

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Everything you ever  wanted to know about mortgage rates and news of the mortgage markets.  MBS and Treasury data provided by Thomson Reuters.

Mortgage News Daily and MBS Live! are exclusive re-distributors of Real Time Thomson Reuters Mortgage Information.

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Form 8936: Plug-in Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Credit--Investopedia

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By 

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The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) offers tax credits to owners and manufacturers of certain plug-in electric drive motor vehicles, including passenger vehicles, light trucks, and two-wheeled vehicles. Taxpayers who own vehicles that qualify may file Form 8936 with their income taxes to claim the tax credit.

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Why lawyers will love the Apple Watch Series 7 - iPhone J.D.

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Jeff Richardson,

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AW7Along with the new iPhone 13 and new iPads, Apple's other major announcement last week was the 2021 version of the Apple Watch called the Apple Watch Series 7.  Depending upon your perspective, it is either an incremental update to the Series 6 or -- because of the larger screen -- the first generation of a new look for the Apple Watch.  From either perspective, this should be a great version of the Apple Watch.





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New Microsoft Office is coming: Release date, pricing and major changes - CNET

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Don't want to subscribe to Microsoft 365? Don't worry: Consumers and small businesses will be able to buy Office 2021 as a one-time purchase this fall, the same time Windows 11 launches. Here's what to know.

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Tom McParland More from This Author

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A New York federal judge issued a temporary restraining order Tuesday that blocked Gov. Kathy Hochul from enforcing a vaccine mandate for health care workers who claim a religious exemption.

The order, from U.S. District Judge David N. Hurd of the Northern District of New York, came in response to a lawsuit filed Monday by a conservative legal organization on behalf of 17 Christian doctors, nurses and therapists who claimed that the COVID-19 vaccines were "connected" to abortions.

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By Sean Lyngaas, CNN Business

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(CNN Business)Apple has updated its software for iPhones to address a critical vulnerability that independent researchers say has been exploited by notorious surveillance software to spy on a Saudi activist.

Researchers from the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab said the software exploit has been in use since February and has been used to deploy Pegasus, the spyware made by Israeli firm NSO Group that has allegedly been used to surveil journalists and human rights advocates in multiple countries.
The urgent update that Apple (AAPL) released Monday plugs a hole in the iMessage software that allowed hackers to infiltrate a user's phone without the user clicking on any links, according to Citizen Lab. The Saudi activist chose to remain anonymous, Citizen Lab said.
    Apple credited the Citizen Lab researchers for finding the vulnerability.
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    Court says turnbacks of tens of thousands of asylum seekers are unlawful  


    A federal judge declared unlawful (full text) the U.S. government's turnbacks of asylum seekers arriving at ports of entry along the U.S. southern border. The court ruled that the United States is required by law to inspect and process asylum seekers when they present themselves at ports of entry and condemned the practice of denying access to the asylum process through metering and similar practices

    The decision came after oral arguments were held before U.S. District Judge Cynthia Bashant of the Southern District of California on August 31. 

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    Debate Over Immigrants' Gun Rights Ignites In 2nd Circ. Case - Law360

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    By Marco Poggio

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    In a decision at the end of July, a three-judge panel delivered a defeat for Perez, holding that the law he challenged was constitutional, but there was a split in reasoning.

    Two judges, Susan L. Carney and John M. Walker, Jr., said in the majority opinion that they were not deciding whether the Second Amendment protects immigrants living in the country illegally like Perez. Even if it did, the judges wrote, the law survives constitutional scrutiny because it protects an important government interest: ensuring public safety.

    The opinion, penned by Judge Walker, relied heavily on the Heller decision. The judges set aside the question of whether Heller meant that the Second Amendment applied only to citizens, instead focusing on the concept of law-abiding. Because he was in the country illegally, Perez had shown disregard for the law, so he could be excluded from the protections of the Second Amendment, the judges said.

    "Perez also does not qualify as a 'law-abiding, responsible citizen' because, however he may choose to live his life in the United States, his presence here is unlawful," the opinion says.

    Gulasekaram said the majority opinion erroneously conflated whether a person is law-abiding with their immigration status. Doing that, the Second Circuit is essentially placing him on the same level as felons, including violent ones, who have been traditionally restricted from possessing firearms. Despite being in the country illegally, Perez had not been convicted of any crime, including immigration crimes, at the time he fired the gun. Being unlawfully present in the United States is not a crime, but an administrative violation.

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    Lawyr

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    It's not got a lot of the bells and whistles you might be used to. What it has got is a whole load of legal types including solicitors, barristers, law students and legal PAs, a whole bunch of people who want to meet them, and you, pecking like a magpie through their profiles. If you're a lawyer, it's finally a chance to trade off your status. You slogged through law school, you scored a great gig, but today the only people you see are either telling you to work all weekend, or trying to avoid you telling them to work all weekend. Now is your time. Meet other lawyers and share your hopes, dreams, fears, bodies and favourite judgments. Or, meet non-lawyers who can appreciate what you bring to the table, such as, well, everything about you, surely. 

    Lawyr is also for anyone who's interested in dating someone in the legal community. 

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    The number of electric vehicle stores in the state is now limited to five, all operated by Tesla, the company headquartered in Palo Alto, California.

    The legislation Environmental Advocates and a second group, the Alliance for Clean Energy, is promoting is sponsored by Sen. Todd Kaminsky, D-Long Island, and Assemblywoman Patricia Fahy, D-Albany.

    Their bill argues the limits on manufacturer-run stores has made it onerous for upstate New Yorkers to get an electric vehicle of their choice.

    "Due to overwhelming demand, these stores are all located downstate, leaving upstate residents without convenient and accessible locations to purchase zero-emission vehicles and preventing any additional electric vehicle companies from opening stores in the state," the legislation states.

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    Florida's GOP-backed 'anti-riot' law blocked by judge--Associated Press

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    By CURT ANDERSON

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    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) -- Florida's new "anti-riot" law championed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis as a way to quell violent protests is unconstitutional and cannot be enforced, a federal judge ruled Thursday.

    The 90-page decision by U.S. District Judge Mark Walker in Tallahassee found the recently-enacted law "vague and overbroad" and amounted to an assault on First Amendment rights of free speech and assembly as well as the Constitution's due process protections.

    People engaged in peaceful protest or innocently in the same area when a demonstration turned violent could face criminal charges and stiff penalties under the law, the judge said. 

    A key issue is defining what the word "riot" means in the statute. Walker noted that past Florida laws sought to prevent demonstrations that could threaten segregationist Jim Crow-era practices.

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    Read full text of Order...

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    Abortion: Justice Department sues Texas over six-week abortion ban - CNNPolitics

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    By Tierney Sneed and Evan Perez, CNN

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    (CNN)The Biden Justice Department sued the state of Texas on Thursday over its new six-week abortion ban, saying the state law is unconstitutional.

    Announcing the lawsuit at a news conference in Washington, Attorney General Merrick Garland said the Texas law's "unprecedented" design seeks "to prevent women from exercising their constitutional rights by thwarting judicial review for as long as possible."
    "The act is clearly unconstitutional under longstanding Supreme Court precedent" Garland said
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    The St. Regis Mohawk Tribe in Northern New York is poised to open the state's first 'legal' marijuana shops, potentially beating non-Indian nation weed retailers to the market by at least a year.

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    DOJ says it will 'protect' women seeking abortions in Texas | TheHill

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    BY OLAFIMIHAN OSHIN 

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    The Department of Justice (DOJ) on Monday said it will protect women who are seeking abortions in the state of Texas amid turmoil following the passage of a controversial restrictive abortion law in the state. 

    In a press release, Attorney General Merrick Garland said the department will explore "all options" to challenge the new Texas law, adding that they will provide support for women in the Lone Star State who are still seeking abortions.

    "The department will provide support from federal law enforcement when an abortion clinic or reproductive health center is under attack. We have reached out to U.S. Attorneys' Offices and FBI field offices in Texas and across the country to discuss our enforcement authorities," Garland said in the statement. 

    "We will not tolerate violence against those seeking to obtain or provide reproductive health services, physical obstruction or property damage in violation of the FACE Act," he said.

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    By Phil McCausland

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    Religious exemptions could prove to be the latest legal battlefield of the pandemic, as Americans opposed to the coronavirus vaccines try to find ways around employer and government vaccination mandates.

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    One driver for testing sincerity is the fact that no major organized religion objects to the vaccines, and Roman Catholic, other Christian, Jewish and Muslim leaders have advised followers to get the shots. Pope Francis went so far as to say that getting vaccinated was "the moral choice because it is about your life but also the lives of others."

    Individually held beliefs, however, could provide some protections.

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    By Andy Rose, CNN

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    Washington, DC (CNN)A district judge in Texas has issued a temporary restraining order against Texas Right to Life, blocking the anti-abortion group from suing abortion providers employed by Planned Parenthood under the state's strict new abortion law, according to a copy of the order provided by Planned Parenthood.

    The law, which took effect this week, bans abortions after as early as six weeks into pregnancy and allows private citizens to bring civil suits against anyone who assists a pregnant person seeking an abortion in violation of the law. It is among the strictest in the nation and bars abortions just after a fetal heartbeat is detected, which is often before a woman knows that she is pregnant.
    Judge Maya Guerra Gamble in Travis County ruled that the medical providers faced "probable, irreparable, and imminent injury" if they were sued by the private group in connection with abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy, as provided for under the law.
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    Ten of the city's storm drowning victims perished in illegally converted basement apartments, with the helpless tenants trapped by water pouring into their subterranean homes, the Department of Buildings said Friday.

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    "DOB inspectors have confirmed that five of the six properties where New Yorkers tragically lost their lives during the floods were illegally converted cellar and basement apartments," said LaRocca, adding inspectors were out Friday conducting safety inspections at more than 1,000 damaged city properties.

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    Transaction Management Falls Short. Here's How Yours Can Be Better

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    Live Webinar:
    Date: September 15, 2021
    Time: 1pm ET/10am PT


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    In this free webinar hosted by legal tech journalist Bob Ambrogi, our expert panel will explore how the traditionally manual, labor-intensive, error-prone process of managing legal transactions can be transformed.

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    By Ariane de Vogue, CNN Supreme Court Reporter

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    In the novel legal strategy, the state Legislature designed the law to prevent government officials from directly enforcing it. The move was meant to make it much more difficult to bring a pre-enforcement challenge because there are not the usual government officials to hold accountable in court. 
    Instead, the law allows private citizens -- anywhere in the country -- to bring civil suits against anyone who assists a pregnant person seeking an abortion in violation of the ban. 
    Opponents say the law is part of a new wave of laws put forward by states hostile to abortion rights and will inspire other states to follow suit.
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    By Tierney Sneed, CNN

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    CNN)Texas state law that bans abortion after as early as six weeks into the pregnancy could provide the playbook for red states to pass extreme abortion restrictions -- without having to wait for the Supreme Court to revisit Roe v. Wade.

    The measure -- signed into law by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott in May -- prohibits abortion providers from conducting abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected. It would effectively outlaw at least 85% of the abortions sought in the state, according to opponents of the law, since that point is around six weeks into the pregnancy, before some women know they're pregnant.
    The law took effect early Wednesday morning after the Supreme Court and a federal appeals court did not rule on attempts to block it.
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