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The Ghost of Internet Explorer Will Haunt the Web for Years | WIRED

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Microsoft's legacy browser may be dead--but its remnants are not going anywhere, and neither are its lingering risks.

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AFTER YEARS OF decline and a final wind-down over the past 13 months, on Wednesday Microsoft confirmed the retirement of Internet Explorer, the company's long-lived and increasingly notorious web browser. Launched in 1995, IE came preinstalled on Windows computers for almost two decades, and like Windows XP, Internet Explorer became a mainstay--to the point that when it was time for users to upgrade and move on, they often didn't. And while last week's milestone will push even more users off the historic browser, security researchers emphasize that IE and its many security vulnerabilities are far from gone.


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The bills propose to require the exchange of information between state, local and federal authorities whenever a gun is used in a crime. The bill A.6716-A/S89-B would make threatening mass harm a crime and bill A.7926-A/S.4116-A would require New York's Criminal Justice Services to investigate whether microstamping-enabled pistols are technologically viable.

Further, the bill A.10428-A/S.9229-A  eradicates the grandfathering of large-capacity ammunition feeding devices that were lawfully possessed prior to the enactment of New York's Safe Act in 2013 or manufactured prior to 1994, prohibiting their possession entirely.  Another bill, A. 10504 / S. 9456, proposes to broaden the definition of  "firearm" to include "firearms that have been modified to be shot from an arm brace."

Bill A10503/S. 9458  would increase the minimum age limit to buy a semiautomatic rife from 18 to 21 and would require that an individual obtains a license prior to purchasing a semiautomatic rifle.

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CRYPTOCURRENCIES HAVE LONG been seen as the Wild West of money transfers, but few online payment and money transfer platforms have been as blatant in appealing for illicit cash as one highlighted but not named in a memorandum opinion unsealed on May 13 in the US District Court in Washington, DC. The platform is apparently based in a "comprehensively sanctioned country"--likely North Korea, according to those within the crypto law space--and advertised its services as evading US financial sanctions. It was built using a US front company that facilitated the purchase of domain names, according to court records.

The platform, which was designed to sidestep financial bans aimed at crippling pariah countries, handled more than $10 million worth of bitcoin that was transferred between the United States and the sanctioned country using a US-based crypto exchange, which, the opinion implies, was not aware that it was helping users avoid sanctions.

The opinion, written by Magistrate Judge Zia Faruqui, was likely unsealed because someone has been arrested for operating the crypto platform. It all marks a shift in the way US law enforcement--and the law--handles cryptocurrencies.


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Plunge in crypto values boosts calls for regulations | The Hill

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BY SYLVAN LANE

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A plunge in cryptocurrency values and the collapse of popular tokens are stoking panic among some investors and boosting pressure on Washington to act. 

Rising interest rates and recession risks have caused sharp sell-offs across financial markets, including the stock market. Many crypto investors have seen their holdings evaporate -- along with major players in the burgeoning digital asset space.

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Cryptocurrencies and the platforms used to exchange and hold them often straddle the gaps between different rules and regulators at both the federal and state levels. Lawmakers in both parties generally agree on the need for adjusting current financial regulations to better fit the unique ways crypto blurs traditional lines between securities, commodities and currencies.

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How to Protect Your Digital Privacy if 'Roe v. Wade' Falls | WIRED

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A critical component of Roe v. Wade is its determination that the "right of privacy ... is broad enough to encompass a woman's decision whether to terminate her pregnancy." But comprehensive digital privacy is challenging to achieve in an age of widespread user-tracking, location-tracking, and corporate data retention. 

Organizations like Digital Defense Fund and Electronic Frontier Foundation offer detailed guides for steps you can take to protect your digital privacy while researching and seeking an abortion or related services. When it comes to a potential dismantling of Roe, though, it remains to be seen how far criminalization will extend in different states and what exactly the landscape will look like. In the meantime, researchers and reproductive health experts note that incorporating a few basic privacy strategies could go a long way later.


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BY CHRIS MILLS RODRIGO 

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Concerns that data gathered from peoples' interactions with their digital devices could potentially be used to identify individuals seeking or performing abortions have come into the spotlight with the news that pregnancy termination services could soon be severely restricted or banned in much of the United States.

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This is not a theoretical threat -- prosecutors have already used phone data to establish intent to terminate a pregnancy.

In a 2017 case in Mississippi, Latice Fisher was charged with second degree murder after showing up to a hospital after having lost her pregnancy. An investigation was launched based on suspicions tied to her failing to return for an ultrasound after admitting to being pregnant during a check up. Prosecutors used searches for the medical abortion pill misoprostol on her phone, which she turned over voluntarily, as evidence in their argument that she had "intentionally" terminated her pregnancy.

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Millions of dollars worth of John Deere agricultural machinery stolen from a dealership in Ukraine by Russian Federation forces has been traced to the Chechen Republic and bricked, it is reported.

In this instance, the Moline, Illinois-based Deere & Co.'s penchant for proprietary digital access controls may have worked out well from a public-relations standpoint, if the account is true. The looted tractors and combine harvesters have been remotely disabled, according to an unidentified Ukrainian interviewed by CNN, leaving those responsible looking for ways to bypass the machinery's digital locks.


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A public-private partnership is throwing the book at climate change, but a treatise for reducing carbon emissions had to be written first.

New York State Energy Research and Development AuthorityEmpire State Realty Trust, the Durst OrganizationVornado Realty Trust and Hudson Square Properties produced a free online guidebook for making buildings compliant with Local Law 97, using the Empire State Building's efforts to go greener as an example.

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Read more...get the guidebook...


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Over the weekend, a GM Cruise converted Chevy Bolt without a driver was pulled over by San Francisco Police. In an unexpected turn, the car "bolted" to a safe spot. Cruise responded.

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JOHN WHITTAKER


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A.940B passed the Assembly by a 102-44 vote largely along party lines. Both Assemblyman Andrew Goodell, R-Jamestown, and Joe Giglio, R-Gowanda, voted against the legislation. Versions of the bill had been introduced in 2019 and 2020 and didn't make it out of the Assembly Governmental Operations Committee. 

A companion bill (S685) has been introduced in the state Senate but has not made it out of the Senate Consumer Protection Committee.

The bill requires the state Municipal Police Training Council, which operates under the state Division of Criminal Justice Services, to develop, maintain and disseminate a minimum standards policy governing the use of automatic license plate reader systems. The minimum standards policy must include provisions on permissible uses of automated license plate reader technology, data sharing and dissemination, prohibited uses, record retention and management, and training. It also calls on the Municipal Police Training Council to recommend to the governor a series of rules and regulations to establish an ongoing training program for all current and new police officers regarding license plate readers along with recommendations for periodic retraining of police officers.

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Chicago audio nerd pirate station airs old radio dramas | WBEZ Chicago

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Radio producer David Goren has been researching, mapping and archiving audio from pirate stations for his Brooklyn Pirate Radio Sound Map project. He said stations exist in West Indian, Latino and some Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods. And despite lots of FCC enforcement in the area, "activity is stable. In Brooklyn there are 25-30 stations on every day," Goren said.

During the pandemic, underground stations moved even closer to their immigrant audiences, he noted. They spent more hours on air and targeted programming to the demographically vulnerable.

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By RENE EBERSOLE


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He Teaches Police "Witching" To Find Corpses. Experts Are Alarmed.

At the National Forensic Academy, crime scene investigators learn to dowse for the dead, though it's not backed by science.

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He says the metal rods can detect "piezoelectricity," an electric charge that builds in certain solid materials such as crystals (it's the reason quartz watches work). Bones under mechanical stress can also produce these charges, which is why, Vass says, some people can find them with dowsing rods. But not everyone, he told me, because "if people don't have the right voltage, it's not going to work." (No peer-reviewed published research has illustrated that piezoelectricity can be used to detect buried remains.) 

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Apple Mac Studio review: Unleash your superpowers--Pocket-Lint

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Stuart Miles

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For most people the Mac Studio is going to be overkill. It's the most powerful Mac we've ever tested. However, if you are dealing with big files - and we mean seriously big files - day in day out then this is going to service those needs... and then some.

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Elon Musk's Starlink Is Helping Ukraine Stay Connected - CleanTechnica

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Starlink is helping Ukraine stay online and Russia isn't too happy about this. Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has shared an important warning on Twitter pointing out that Starlink is the only non-Russian communications system that is still working in some parts of Ukraine. The probability of being targeted, he added, is high. Elon advised users to use it with caution.

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If Russia Invades Ukraine, TikTok Will See It Up Close | WIRED

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ON THE SNOWY roads near Kursk, tanks and military equipment stop traffic. Videos from around the Russian city--roughly 100 miles from the border with Ukraine--show cars waiting in line to cross train tracks being used to transport tanks from one place to the next. Dozens of military vehicles have been filmed parked together. And shaky footage shows tanks rumbling across snowy ground alongside a busy road. All of these records have one thing in common: They were shared on TikTok.




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"There is a lot of data out there," says Benjamin Strick, investigations director at the Centre for Information Resilience (CIR), a nonprofit organization that focuses on countering influence operations. The CIR team, along with other open source investigators, have been busy verifying and mapping videos of troop movements in Russia and Belarus for several weeks, painstakingly comparing landmarks in video footage with satellite images and other official data to confirm their authenticity. The CIR's map of verified videos plots the movements of military equipment and troops all around Ukraine's eastern flanks. In January, the CIR mapped 79 pieces of footage; in February, it has verified 166 videos so far.

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Are You Being Tracked by an AirTag? Here's How to Check | WIRED

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WHEN THE AIRTAG launched in 2021, Apple's Bluetooth tracker with ultra-wideband was lauded as a step toward the future of augmented reality and a great way to find everyday objects, like your lost TV remote. Cybersecurity experts expressed concern that the tracking device would be exploited by stalkers. As we get closer to AirTag's one-year anniversary, those warnings appear prescient.


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Are You Being Tracked by an AirTag? Here's How to Check | WIRED

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WHEN THE AIRTAG launched in 2021, Apple's Bluetooth tracker with ultra-wideband was lauded as a step toward the future of augmented reality and a great way to find everyday objects, like your lost TV remote. Cybersecurity experts expressed concern that the tracking device would be exploited by stalkers. As we get closer to AirTag's one-year anniversary, those warnings appear prescient.


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NEW YORK -- Civil rights groups sued over its constitutionality. State legislatures are studying its efficacy. San Francisco declared it antithetical to democracy.

But the mayor of the nation's most populous city is fully embracing the use of facial recognition technology by the police and is now exploring a dramatic expansion in how it is used.

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A Fight Over the Right to Repair Cars Turns Ugly | WIRED

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Subaru disabled the telematics system and associated features on new cars registered in Massachusetts last year as part of a spat over a right-to-repair ballot measure approved, overwhelmingly, by the state's voters in 2020. The measure, which has been held up in the courts, required automakers to give car owners and independent mechanics more access to data about the car's internal systems.

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Top 5 legal technology news stories of 2021--ABA Journal

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BY NICOLE BLACK

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In other words, if nothing else, 2021 was an eventful year. Identifying the top five legal technology news stories of the year wasn't easy, but the common thread of remote work and its effects filtered through the newsworthy items that made the list.

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