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Patients Steamed Over Fundraising Letters

Today's San Francisco Chronicle online has a piece bemoaning health care fundraising activity as an invasion of patient privacy:

Joan Broner, like many people, never reads the fine print at her medical appointments.

As a consequence, the 58-year-old San Francisco resident, who has arthritis, regularly receives solicitation letters at home from several local hospitals. The letters infuriate her.

"It feels like an invasion of privacy," she said. "If I'm sick and I go to a doctor, I don't want them telling anybody about it. My disease is not for sale."

Read the rest here.

I have a hard time finding sympathy for someone who gets a fundraising letter from a hospital, particularly a someone that proudly admits to not reading "fine print." On the other hand, quite a few folks seem to be worked up about it.

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on May 27, 2008 9:53 AM.

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